As you may have heard, the Board of Directors of Opera have forwarded a recommendation to our shareholders to consider an acquisition offer from a consortium of leading Chinese internet firms, Qihoo 360 and Kunlun.

In the desktop team, we think this is good news. If the deal is realized, Opera for computers will be able to reach more users, faster. We will be able to accelerate our roadmaps, fix more bugs and contribute more code to the web.

OperaForComputers

Over the last year, Opera for computers user base has grown by more than 5 million users –  not bad, considering that the PC market is in a sharp decline.

We have also been working on making our browser significantly faster, stable and more secure. We are refining the features you depend on, and we are prototyping new features that will improve the web for you. We are also a major contributor to the Blink rendering engine, second only to Google. Our Desktop team has grown, and we keep adding great people, like Jon Hicks, so we can bring you the best quality product possible.

But, we want to do even more! We want to build a browser that reaches more desktops, laptops and people like you. We think web browsers should be made not only for people living on the U.S. west coast, and we would like to see healthy competition for the next billion of users who will be joining us online. Not all of these people will use desktops or laptops to access the web, but those who do should definitely try Opera.

So, what’s next?

startpage-news-separateOpera users can expect much from us in the year to come. Since the acquisition of SurfEasy, we have already been working in secret to add features, based on new Opera VPN technology, that will find their way into our products in the coming months. These features will boost your productivity and enhance your privacy in our desktop browser.

Also, we think browsers can and should be more … well … useful for users. A year ago, I asked some of Opera’s longtime employees – and browser enthusiasts – including Håkon Wium Lie, Karl Anders Øygard and Jan Standal, to form what we call  the Opera Concept group. They are hard at work on new product ideas and better features, as  they explore what the web could look like in the future – not only next year, but also within 2, 5 and 10 years from now.  At this point, we have more ideas than manhours, but we do look forward to launching some exciting, new concepts this year for you.

So, to sum up: we remain committed to the open web, to Opera’s legacy as innovator, and to our users all over the world. For many of us, our desktop browser remains the most important tool in our lives, and we promise to improve it even further.

We can’t wait to see what we come up with next. Stay tuned!

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  • NoName

    I don’t think you are gonna stop.
    But how can you make that promise, when it’s out of your control?

    • http://www.opera.com Zhenis Beisekov

      @disqus_3M0bVH90cs:disqus let our work prove itself.

  • Jaiba Mon

    Opera for Desktop is the best browser for Windows, please don’t let it die :)

    • http://www.opera.com Zhenis Beisekov

      We love it as well. So we want more people to know that it exists and give it a try.

      • xirit64

        Which by the 100% acquisition won’t be in your hands though as others will decide that?

        • http://www.opera.com Zhenis Beisekov

          Following your logic, then for a public stock company – as we are now – we cannot make any decisions, because shareholders will decide about everything. It is true to the extend that all shareholders always want just one thing – growth.

          • xirit64

            If you would allow me to correct you slightly on that, they always want “money”, growth is just a mean for it. For someone who cares only about his money, names, employees and ethics don’t tell him anything, that’s why even hostile acquisitions are common, next to growth or strategic reforms. And actually you do what shareholders want actually, that’s why you have a CEO and a board who gives the general direction to the middle management who give it to the team leaders, programmers etc, don’t you? 😛

          • http://www.opera.com Zhenis Beisekov

            As I already commented, let our work prove itself.

          • xirit64

            True that for what it’s worth keeping strong and doing your best. I wish you the best anyway!

          • http://www.opera.com Zhenis Beisekov

            Thanks, @xirit64:disqus!

          • Krystian Kolondra

            That’s correct. However being delisted from the stock exchange has some advantages too – example could be Dell’s story. They can focus a lot more long term than trying to satisfy investors every quarter.

          • xirit64

            That’s true. But aren’t those 3 companies also publicly traded in China which means nothing changes in your case?

  • xirit64

    Mr. Kolondra I can see you trying to be optimistic but the fact that according to this article http://techcrunch.com/2016/02/09/chinese-tech-group-led-by-qihoo-360-bids-1-2b-for-browser-maker-opera/ a gaming company called Kunlun and a future co-owner of yours has recently bought 60 percent share of the gay dating service called Grindr doesn’t sound like the best for long-term sustainability, at least to me.

    • Olli

      Are you homophobic or what?

      • xirit64

        You can’t be serious about that, you are telling me that companies that invest in porn or whatever services can provide more long term sustainability to employees, staff and IT business, instead of being acquired by a trustworthy, traditional company like IBM or Intel?

        • Olli

          First, Grindr has nothing to do with porn. It is a dating app just like Tinder. Also you should maybe inform yourself a little bit more about these Chinese companies. Quihoo is a REALLY big player on the Chinese market. You shouldn’t worry about sustainability, these companies are BIG. And again, Grindr has nothing to do with porn. You could take a look who owns Tinder and compare then – that would make more sense.

          The real question is: Will browser development stay in Europe for the long term. And I don’t think the answer to that question will be yes.

          • xirit64

            Dude, Grindr is a dating service ok? Point made.

          • Krystian Kolondra

            If the deal happens – there are no plans to change that. We plan to continue operating Opera as a stand-alone company. The organization will remain as it is today and Lars Boilesen will continue as CEO.

            Please note that the biggest value in any software company are its employees and their competence. And we have really, really good ones.

          • Olli

            For the time being – for sure. That’s why I said long term.

            I know that devs are one of the most valuable ressources in a software company. So why did you get rid of almost the entire old Opera Desktop dev team? Almost all old valuable ressources are already lost (competitive advantage through own engine and exclusive features, devs, the „fathers“ of Opera etc.) so there’s not much left to lose anymore.

          • Krystian Kolondra

            Well, that’s not true that valuable people are gone. There are still many, many people around that were in the company for many years and their experience and expertise are just amazing. But please note Opera employs around 1500 people today and when I joined 10 years ago there were only 300. There will be more new faces than old faces in any growing company.

          • xirit64

            Experience with software companies and especially gaming companies and their acquisitions by publishers who invest in a wide spectrum of activities has shown though that after a quiet “safe” period where everyone keeps his position, their brand name, their “vision” etc, there comes a restructuring mostly because of losses and risks in those other investments and overall corporate greed which leads then to layoffs, a full absorbency of the employees in a different, huge and bulky corporate cloud environment, leaving no room for innovation and expression which means inferior product quality and the real “end”, the dissolution of a previously good developer company, that had started already with the acquisition but nobody wanted to believe. That’s why acquisitions usually don’t end well for those that are being acquired, except for the shareholders of course who make a profit in short-mid-term. By the first shake though they will be long gone and people will be left with an inferior product, and that circle will go on in the same way for the next company, etc, etc… So looking it from the user’s perspective, acquisitions are not the best thing.

          • Krystian Kolondra

            Yes, gaming is a tough industry – a little bit because it’s a hit driven business; and it’s a pity many excellent game studios I remember from from a decade ago are no longer around like Black Isle Studios (which I think some tried to revive).

            On the other hand – there are thousands of acquisitions that don’t end up that way. Even at Opera we’ve acquired several companies and they have been very successful.

            What I tried to capture with my post – for us it is not about keeping the status quo. It’s about opportunities.

          • postdante

            Sorry, but plans are a subject for change. Of course they won’t do a earthshake just from the start but wait and see.

    • jedy123

      Seriously, I’m not gay but I’m aware of this apps huge popularity. Sounds like this gaming firm know a savvy business deal when they see one.

      • xirit64

        Exactly and that sounds dangerous to me, as those companies are investing in whatever…

        • jedy123

          Dangerous? You do sound homophobic.

          • xirit64

            I think you are the real homophobic here, you like using that word for no reason don’t you, that explains it.

          • jedy123

            Accusing you of being homophobic, which I’ve only done once whilst defending Grindr against your comments makes your comment look stupid.

          • jedy123

            Btw, editing your comment so it no longer accuses me of calling you homophobic twice says it all really!

          • xirit64

            I get it, I get it, you want to be the biggest troll in this blog. Well you are. Congratulations.

          • xirit64

            Well you ‘d better stop insulting people, after all it’s not my fault that technet wrote “and newly listed games firm Kunlun, which last month snapped up a majority 60 percent share in gay dating service Grindr.”
            But I think you do that out of trolling as you would also accuse that site of being homophobic because they wrote the word gay in that article when they should leave it out according to you.

  • muratservan

    I switched to Vivaldi today after learning rumours are true, I just want to say I wish the best for you Opera employers. Also thanks to Opera for being my default browser for more than 8 years and working like charm. Surfing on the web was amazing with you. Goodbye Opera.

    • Olli

      Too bad Vivaldi still is a buggy mess on OS X.

      • jedy123

        And the Speed Dial on Vivaldi isn’t a patch on Operas Speed Dial.

      • http://wiidatabase.de/ iCON

        Well, it’s still a beta after all!

    • LoverOfLife

      Maybe current developers will make a new browser called Mozart.. Sad news for me..

      • xirit64

        LOL sorry but I had to laugh with that, please not another name of a classical composer again, I beg you xD

        • Christian Büte

          You know…there is a Linux distribution called, Symphony OS. 😀

    • Ghirahim

      So you switched to another browser because Opera will get a new owner? That is hands down the dumbest thing I’ve ever read here.

      • muratservan

        I don’t want to use any Chinese company’s product, that’s simple. And I just came here to say my thanks and wishes before completely leaving Opera not read rude comments as yours.

        • x a

          You don’t like Chinese?

          I don’t think the development will go in the right™ direction. It’s a business model thing as I understand it, not a thing with China per se.

    • Slawek Sochaj

      Sorry to hear about it. We’ll keep doing our best, so you come back soon.

    • xirit64

      I’d say wait and see, after all many people were angry about the closure of the Oslo offices and said the same back then but the rest of the team actually did a fine job with the browser and sorry to say this and it might sound harsh but I feel it’s the truth, some things that were not in the cards and were constantly denied before the closure of the Oslo offices were actually implemented and much more improved for the PC platform after that. So as you and others including me despite the initial shock have stayed with Opera for so long I wouldn’t bother waiting and seeing how it evolves before jumping the gun :)

      • plague

        I both agree and disagree. The new Opera has become a sleek and fast browser. It’s currently the best looking browser and one of the fastest.
        Good job on that!

        However, I still miss the ability to make my own damn choices on how the UI should work.
        The old team (that are now at Vivaldi) understood the importance of such a thing.
        The new team does not seem to do that.
        Every time something changes, no matter how small of a css change, they refuse to provide an option for allowing a choice. Instead the users simply have to get used to the change.

        Remember that the internal pages in Opera are html documents and css style sheets. Thus the position of the navbar, for example, is a simple css change. You can very easily put it anywhere you want, _if_ you have access to the css.
        The addition/removal of the separate News page is simple html + css and maybe a few lines of scripting.
        Hiding the + button on the speed dial? one line in css.
        I do web development for a living, I know full well how to do these things and I know they are very simple to do. Yet, we are not allowed to change even the simplest of ui-settings.

        The entire ui in Vivaldi is built on html, javscript and css, and they allow the users to change the css stylesheets, which means the ability to move things around, buttons, panels, search fields, etc. As it should be.
        You’re allowed to move the entire tab-bar around and decide if the tabs should be at the top, bottom or any of the sides.
        Yet, everyday users won’t even know that this feature exist unless they look for it. It does in no way complicate things for users. As it shouldn’t.

        I still like Opera as a browser more than Vivaldi, due to it being much sleeker and currently faster as well.
        But I like the openness of Vivaldi a lot more than the unnecessary closedness of Opera.

        I wish I wish I wish there was an open source blink-engine browser as fast and sleek as Opera and as open as Vivaldi, so that I could make my own damned decisions.

        Open sourcing Opera would be a dream come true and I think that would put serious pressure on Mozilla, as Opera is a much better browser but the free software community prefer Firefox or pure Chromium due to the open source nature of them. That would be a significant increase in users if they were to switch to Opera.

  • Raylan Givens

    Nice… Chinese companies… You gonna lose some Europeans and North Americans, you gonna gain Chinese, a lot of them, I suppose. I understand there’s no reason to fear Chinese companies more than North Americans, but still, I don’t like. Who cares what I think, though :S

    • Tommy Wille

      That is a plausible consequence. There’s generally a lot of skepticism towards Chinese companies in the west. I hang a lot on security forums and my impression is that most won’t touch Chinese-based products, regardless of performance results. This is an observation from my side, not a personal opinion towards their quality.

      It’ll be interesting to see the development of the user base if the acquisition goes through.

      • Raylan Givens

        Do you think the Chinese will put a lot of money in the development sector? What for? Are they gonna support Google’s Chromium underlying engine? I kinda doubt about… Let’s see what is going to happen.

        Opera went to Eastern Europe and now to… East…

        • xirit64

          That without doubt will be very interesting and intriguing indeed. I can even imagine Opera being renamed to Quihoo in a short time, that would make things even more interesting.

          • Olli

            Quihoo already has its own browser (google it, of course running on Chromium) and I’m rather sure that Opera will replace it. Opera is denying everything in that direction but it would make much sense.

          • xirit64
          • Olli

            Ah, sorry, didn’t see that! So we’re already two guys thinking in this direction. As I read Quihoo this was the first thing that came to my mind. I even tested their browser once as an alternative to Opera but didn’t switch. It lacks a lot of features and most importantly: It lacks translations in many or even all Western languages besides English. They’ll get a readily translated browser for the Western world with Opera. And they want to become a big player on the worldwide browser market for sure!

          • xirit64

            Since Quihoo has already a bigger user base and there is far more potential in a country of 1.3 billion people I assume that in the best scenario, Opera will be branded as Quihoo in China and will remain as is in the rest of the world (like Opel and Vauxhall under GM). In the worst scenario Opera will be renamed to Quihoo for everybody and I don’t know if we are “ready” for accepting this :)
            And of course it has to be seen how serious they are and into what direction they will drive the browser to (what Raylan said about willing to support Chromium etc)

          • Olli

            That’s possible, but I don’t know if a company as big as Quihoo will stay with such a solution for a long time. They want their brand to become succesful wordwilde, so it’s probably going to be renamed to Quihoo’s name everywhere sometime.

            I know Quihoo claims their browser is super popular in China but there’s no trustworthy data on that. The newest stats from statcounter don’t even mention Quihoo’s browser for China anymore, it’s just among the “other” category. Seems like its success in China is already over, it really was rather popular 3-4 years ago. The funny thing is: According to statcounter, the browser now hast become the 5th most popular browser in the US! I guess a lot of Asian Americans are using it. This clearly speaks against not renaming Opera for the Western market.

        • Angela Wang

          Hi Raylan. Ownership does not change the identity of the company. We will still be a Norwegian company and operate from our headquarters in Oslo (to your question above) /Angela

      • DhulKarnain

        Qihoo has a terrible reputation with very good reason.
        http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2483498,00.asp

  • INFINUM

    No, God, no! ((( Not again!…

  • PaulW

    Guess if this goes thru you’ll all be moving to China..

    • Slawek Sochaj

      China is a beautiful country, but our offices in Norway, Poland, US and other countries are doing really great, and we are not going to leave them.

      • Olli

        You remember when you dropped Presto? You colleagues almost said the same things, everything will stay as it was etc. Today they’re working at Vivaldi.

        • Slawek Sochaj

          We are not saying everything will stay as it is. We are saying this is a big opportunity for our desktop browser to grow.

          • Olli

            For sure it is. But growth at any price? I don’t know…

  • Kartofel

    And here i was thinking that i’ll finally move to the new opera… So this is how my 11 years adventure with opera ends… I guess i’ts time to look for an opensource alternative.

    • Slawek Sochaj

      Sorry to hear about it. Hope you will give us another chance, as we will remain committed to Opera’s legacy, and to our users.

      • plague

        What legacy?
        Since Opera 15, we’ve been begging and begging you to re-implement some pretty basic features from O12 that pretty much defined “Opera” as a browser. Yet you mostly never even respond to those requests.
        That’s not remaining committed to Operas legacy at all.

  • WhiteCat

    #stillmyopera

  • sgrandin

    I don’t care who you buy or add, as an Opera user since 2006 I’ll start taking the new Opera seriously – I’d be glad to take the new Opera seriously – when it starts doing things to help users like adding a home page button to the address bar or having the start page button open the users home page; gives users control of tab placement; formats the speed dial per user settings to the window size instead of vice versa, and gives users control of SD thumbnail size, and offers print scaling on the fly. Just the basics of browser use, the sort of things that should have been done long ago.

  • tafugate

    the best to you guys. i’ve been an opera user since 4-something. looking forward to many years to come.

    • Slawek Sochaj

      Much appreciated! Thanks for your support.

  • http://eridani.me/ eridani

    Best of luck to you Krystian and to the whole Opera team!

    Be certain that as long as Opera continue innovating without compromising quality, security and openness, myself and many others will continue supporting your work.

    • Krystian Kolondra

      Thank you @eridanired123:disqus! You can count on us doing our best!

    • taneli

      How exactly has it been “innovating” anymore? o.O Using Google’s engine, using their Aura for the UI, taking their PDF reader and copying their SpeedDial and Bookmarks Manager (Albeit editing them a bit), while mitigating many options (yes, well, some useless options when it comes to power users). Other than that, being just merely a clone with their own seasoning on top.

      One thing i can tip my hat to them is Turbo, which, well, is from the old Opera days anyways.

    • Licaon_Kter

      Chinese owned closed source browser will certainly have plenty of “security and openness”, right?

      • http://eridani.me/ eridani

        Being chinese owned has nothing to do with anything aside from prejudices and discrimination.

        Closed source is certainly not the best for talking about openness, but I was thinking more in their communication to their users and their approach to web standards like supporting video and audio alternatives to mp3 and h264 for example.

      • Angela Wang

        Hi. I understand your concern. I want to assure you that there is zero change to how we practice data security issues and other national legislation. Shareholders are third parties. Under Norwegian law any transfer of data is a transfer to a third party and subject to applicable EU/EEA regulations on data transfers. A change in ownership has zero effect on our obligations under applicable privacy law. /Angela

        • Licaon_Kter

          Well you know… “market changes”, “online studies”, “nobody is irreplaceable”, “our developer lab is cheaper and closer to main chinese offices”, “chinese laws must be respected”, “it’s faster with Turbo 3 and/or SurfVPN2 (with more servers in China)”… life happens.

          Meet you here in 6 months and let’s draw some conclusions, and as somebody above already said ( “No, God, no! ((( Not again!…” ) this is not the first Opera sudden change.
          The first one ( drop Presto; become Chrome+skin+misc ) shaked abit of that 2% market share, many powerusers and many devs ( hello Vivaldi ! ), hopefully this bump won’t shake them all, sometimes money is not the answer. 😉

  • Marko Koivuniemi

    Nice save or at least nice try. Harsh reaction is all about that we (still) care about Opera.
    I have been testing also Vivaldi but Opera is still much more suitable for my needs.
    **
    Order Information:
    ——————
    Registration Date : 20010301 (yyyy/mm/dd)
    Number of Users : 1 ONLY
    Total Payment in NOK : 180 (Norwegian Kroner)
    Rate Of Exchange (USD / NOK) : 9.036
    Payment Type : Wire Transfer
    **
    Keep up the good work.

    • Krystian Kolondra

      Glad to see Opera 5 user!
      Thank you @Marko Koivuniemi:disqus!

    • xirit64

      pfff that’s Opera 5, I am using Opera since version 3 (1998) :)

  • Lord Lestat

    Interesting. First you intentionally ignore your power and geek users for simple users/Chrome users and throwing away most of your old customization options and then you are sold to China?

    Uh well, no offense but your seriously managed to anger a big part of your user base now twice. Congratulations, you enter the realm of Mozilla with this. They too made countless mistakes on their quest for being most attractive to simple users and ignoring power users needs.

    Quite ironic, isn’t it. Luckily there are with Otter and Vivaldi 2 browsers around who have the old Opera spirit. Targeting simple users and Chrome users when most of your user base loved customization is really no smart idea. Mozilla and Opera are really the most biggest disappointments in software development.

    And the sad thing is, you could have done different. Both of you!

    • Derick Peterson

      The thing with Otter is that it’s a one-person job, and those never really get anywhere. But with Vivaldi, it’s Opera’s ex-CEO Jon Von Tetschner along with his team. He’ll grow it to a large size as he did with Opera and make it a real browser made for his friends, for power users, and for everyone, because it’s a browser you can make it yours.

  • TheGaladras

    Just wanted to wish you all the best for the future, guys. I´m an Opera user since 2007 (together with Firefox, just my team of choice for years now) and I´m really looking forward to what´s coming next in the upcoming releases, especially the new skin for Windows 10 which I really enjoy.

    To be honest I was shocked when you migrated from Presto to Blink. Opera 15 has been an awful peace of software. Right now Opera 35 is the browser which I want to see from Opera and the missing features from the past are now implemented, so I´m all happy now. Hopefully you are going to continue like this. :)

    And btw good decision to stay in Norway. Oslo is definitely more beautiful than Beijing. 😉

    • Krystian Kolondra

      Thanks @TheGaladras:disqus!

      We’re not moving anywhere :) and yes we definitely like Oslo, especially long sunny days during the summer. But we also have a super cool outpost in Nice in France! Not to mention beautiful offices in Wrocław and Warsaw.

      Glad you like #35, we will continue!

  • Kurt Zon

    My guess is that most end users won’t even notice the change in ownership. I for one will be staying on board and am looking forward to a faster paced development cycle.
    I hope you guys and gals will be well looked after…

    • Leonardo Gomes

      I think in the same way. I guess this change will be less noticiable and painful for the users than the change to Chromium.

  • Cryio

    Opera is already a much better browser than Chrome /X64. It’s faster, uses less CPU, less RAM, it actually renders the web better than Chrome (hilarious if you ask me).

    The UI, speed dial, bookmark menu, recently closed AND the fact that is can actually use most of Chrome’s extensions make it a far better browser for me than Chrome can ever be.

    • Angela Wang

      Thank you so much! We wish to have the same stand on mobile as well and give users a great option outside of Chrome for Android /Angela

  • Kirby green

    If the customizable mouse gesture is back to Opera, I will not care about anything else.

    • http://icah-banjarmasin.blogspot.com/ Icahbanjarmasin

      I know that Opera wants to be competitive..

  • Flytutu

    Good luck to the whole Opera team! I used Opera form 8 to 12.17.I’m very sorry to hear that be sold to Qihoo 360-the fxxk company.Fom 3721 to 360,it always notorious.Good bye Opera!

    • Angela Wang

      Hi. Qihoo 360 is one of the internet companies among the consortium interested in Opera, not the only one. Qihoo alone does not represent the biggest share /Angela

      • Flytutu

        Hi Angela! 我理解您的工作.没有人比国内朋友更了解这个大流氓360了.如果收购达成,我只能惋惜曾经最爱的浏览器.不过对整个开发团队或其他工作人员应该是好事,谁也不可能永远生活在理想里.祝你们幸福!

        • Angela Wang

          大家讲的情况我已经据实向上反映了。从现在的情况来看,合同暂时没有签,浏览器和其他产品一切不变。谢谢您!/Angela

  • Regis

    I’m an Opera user in Taiwan . If changing ownership can make Opera grow faster & better, then why not ? Volvo is owned by Chinese company now but the name & quality remains the same . Don’t mess up Chinese with Chinese Communist Party ! I don’t like Chinese Communist Party but I do like Chinese people .

    • lyl yuan

      360 is not a Chinese Communist Party company , that is a private company , but 360 is a the biggest Unwanted Software company in china , i don’t liked them , so you Wrong target !

      • Regis

        Golden Brick, a group comprised of Qihoo 360, one of China’s most visible (and controversial) Internet companies which recently went private in a $9.3 billion deal, and newly listed games firm Kunlun, which last month snapped up a majority 60 percent share in gay dating service Grindr. Investment firm Yonglian is the final member.

    • Angela Wang

      Thank you for your support :) 謝謝台灣用戶的支持 /Angela

  • albert71292

    I’m willing to give Opera’s new owners the benefit of the doubt. After all, as a long time Livejournal user, I didn’t notice anything bad happening with them after a Russian firm purchased them several years ago.

    • Angela Wang

      Great to know :) Thanks for your openness! /Angela

  • DhulKarnain

    More depressing news and all the inane hash-tags in the world can’t help. Hopefully Vivaldi will become a viable alternative before this transfer of ownership occurs. I’d never use a product which stands under the banner of a disreputable and nefarious company like Qihoo. First you kill off Presto and still I came back but now you kill off thevery soul of a proud browser that Opera once was. Shame, shame, shame. Bye, Opera

  • Tauque

    I’m chinese, and a 8 year long user of Opera. I like Opera so much, so much so that it seems a bit ridiculous, as if Opera had become a indispensable part of my life. but still, I will stop using Opera as soon as Opera has been aquired by the Chinese firms, and I know many chinese users share this opinion. My poor English doesn’t allow me to tell you guys how terrible Qihoo 360 is, I wish Opera a good luck. So sad, after 8 years, finally I have to consider using a different browser, because Opera is selling itself to a company of my own country. My heart dies a little bit.

    • lyl yuan

      I am too,so look at 楼上

      • Angela Wang

        嗨!感谢你们来到我们的博客留言。关于大家的一些担心,我们感到很抱歉。到现在为止,整个谈判过程还在进行中,还没有完全结束。即使将来opera的组织结构有变化,我们打算继续作为独立的公司,主要由挪威的总部运行,继续给我们的浏览器和app进行更新。如果大家有任何特别的担心或意见,请与我邮件联系social-networks@opera.com。:)/angela

        • led9ru

          你認為你的語言是可以理解的?

        • lyl yuan

          这次交易中,歌剧将变悲剧!这是由于周鸿祎的及360公司的基因使然,以周鸿祎产品经理出身的性格,不可能只要opera的国际名声而不要用opera来耍流氓,beauty!以溢价50%左右来收购一个公司,在这样一个不太好的经济背景下,钱不可能扔到水里去游泳。happy new year

          • Angela Wang

            Hi Yuan, 大家说的情况我们了解,已经向上反映了。现在一起还没有完全定下来。及时合同签了,关于Opera的发展也是要通过现在挪威的领导班子加上股东一起商议,最大股东会是昆仑。/Angela

    • deroxil

      Почему у меня ощущение, что ты такой же китаец, как я – латиноамериканец… -__-

      Цитаты поста Tauque: “Китай говно”, “Моя страна говно, так считают и все мои сограждане”, “Opera станет китайской и застрелюсь”…
      “Я сам из Китая, сын Мао Цзэдуна. Поверьте, здесь не всё так однозначно. Никто не хочет, чтобы китайцы покупали Opera”…

      Опять везде повылезали амерзкие тролле-боты.

      “Дебилы, бл*дь” (с)

      П.С.: пользовался браузером Opera и буду продолжать пользоваться браузером Opera, и после перехода браузера под контроль китайцев. Может они хоть дадут толчок к развитию и большему охвату рынков разных стран.

  • lyl yuan

    opera will be marry to 360 from china ,what is next

  • lyl yuan

    360 is a the biggest Unwanted Software company in china

    • Angela Wang

      Hi there. We will still be committed to our browsers and apps. Opera will still be Opera and the same teams will be building and refining Opera products under the same guidelines :) /Angela

      • plague

        No you wont.
        You will follow the orders of your new owners, whatever they are.
        You have no choice in the matter, after being acquired.
        It will be _their_ vision for the company and brand that will be the driving factor, not _your_ vision.
        That’s what happens when someone buys something. They get to decide what to do with the thing they just bought.
        It’s not rocket science.

  • lyl yuan

    so opera will be tragedy ,that all !

  • Terry

    So…how about Opera Max and data saving mode in Opera? All the data would go through Opera’s servers and be processed. China still runs strict Internet censorship policy, and many information are banned on Internet in China. I don’t know if someday the Opera would be forced to accept the China government’ policy to filter out information the government doesn’t like.

    • Slawek Sochaj

      Our user’s privacy is important to us and in the past Opera has handled user’s information strictly in accordance with Norwegian law. There is no foreseeable change to the way we handle user information. The current statement and guidelines on privacy can be viewed here. http://www.opera.com/privacy

      • plague

        “no foreseeable change”..
        Of course not, but once acquired, you have no choice but to follow orders from your new owner. If they want to make changes, they will, and there will be nothing you can do about it.
        Them claiming that they don’t want to make changes is just sales talk. Of course they will say anything you want to hear, so you will sell to them.

        History has shown time and time again what happens after acquisitions in the tech industry.
        More often than not, the purchased company cease to exist and a lot of times, the brands cease to exist as well, being renamed into the parent company’s existing brands.
        Very often, the products cease to exist and some of the tech gets incorporated into various other products.

        These are facts that can be easily verified by a simple Google search.

        • Slawek Sochaj

          We are a Norwegian company subject to Norwegian (EU/EEA) privacy law. Our shareholders may change but our legal obligations in this respect will not. All data will continue to be handled in accordance with our Norwegian legal obligations — nothing has changed in this respect.

  • John Askins

    Please consider licensing BitTorrent Sync, to allow users to created synchronized folders full of files, synchronized to the cloud (like Google Drive). This will allow collaborative works using the Opera browser, and allow the browser to do more; extending it to a sort of “internet desktop”, rather than a “portal to the internet”.

    (Also, please consider adding Project Maelstrom from the guys at BitTorrent as anm enabled feature in Opera. Adding better privacy and anonymity is a tremendous advantage that can help Opera to stand out among the crowd.)

    More and more I see people using their bookmarks (and their Speed Dial, if they use Opera) the same way they use shortcuts and programs on their desktop, or apps on their mobile phones. To check for updates, new e-mails, to work on projects, to set up appointments, etc. Opera has even added nested folders, just like a file system, to allow better management of bookmarks.

    Why not have a browser that’s ready for the changes in user preferences of 2016? Why not BE that browser?

  • Matt Humphrey

    Please reconsider!

  • nanana1

    I will be adopting a cautious wait-and-see approach if the new owners of Opera are confirmed to be a China company and once there are signs and evidences that users privacy and protection are compromised in its software coding that will be the end of my Opera adventure and journey.

  • Sabin Bajracharya

    Do it, So you guys can innovate and develop at a faster rate and increase Opera active users but don’t let the Chinese violate the user privacy and tell you guys what to do and what not to do!

    • led9ru

      Tell that to your owner 😉

  • Joe438

    Congrats on being considered by the leading Chinese internet firms! I know it is not a done deal yet, but I hope it goes well. I know that Opera wants to be competitive, but I do hope that Opera continues to offer the features that help it to stand apart from the other browsers such as tools for power users and the ability to make Opera our own through customizations. I also like Opera’s emphasis on privacy and its willingness to reinvent itself if it needs to without giving up its core philosophy.

    As the device market continues to grow, I’m happy to know us desktop computer guys will not be forgotten.

    Again, I hope the deal goes well and you have my support :)

  • Максимка

    So, this how it goes… Прощай, Opera. К сожалению, ты оказалась не такой сильной к изменениям существующих реалии. Я всегда был с тобой, как только у меня появился интернет — с 2005 года! И даже после отказа Presto я был с тобой. Я не смогу пережить еще одно издевательство над тобой, а оно, я уверен, будет. Прощай, друг мой.

    Разработчики, которые вкладывали душу в разработку, мир вам! Успехов.

    • led9ru

      Всё китайское очень качественное – китайский айфон, китайское говно – теперь вот Opera китайская.
      But change browser = i do it when currently version opera(not china-maded-shit) become obsolete.

  • Harry

    If the acquisition offer from a consortium in China is accepted, then I personally will find another browser.

    I will not use a browser owned by the Chinese simply on principle.

    This is a disastrous move by Opera.

    • Slawek Sochaj

      Would be sorry to see you go! As we said, we will remain committed to Opera’s legacy, and to our users.

      • jho

        @disqus_bKoGUbB0yW:disqus: Read his disqus history and then you will understand that it is better that he leaves.

  • sgrandin

    Be interesting what happens when the next witchhunt against the China starts, as it most likely will sooner or later. Will Opera users be labeled commies, traitors, etc.?

    • Terry

      Witch-hunt results from the “famous” reputation of Qihoo 360. Can’t blame users.

  • II_ARROWS

    #StilYourOpera died after version 12, an never recovered half of the functionality it had, as I still have the last version of Opera, still working.

    Viva Vivaldi!

    • WhiteCat

      #blehvivaldispam

  • proxxy

    Great news for vivaldi team 😀

  • tarkus

    I cannot figure out if the news are good or bad. One sure thing: with this deal Opera is stabilizing financially and people working there – as it seems now – are keeping their jobs and their perspectives! Opera administration is looking after the market share – it’s the second time that this happens, i.e. finding a new strategy to survive even if they have to dump some of their ‘public’ in order to expand to new territories. Private-wise, Maxthon is a good Chinese browser which – outside China – is not imposing any limits to browsing so, why anything like that happens to Opera? Of course everything is under consideration, but I feel I must give Opera a chance. After all, the target is excellent browsing and nowadays (in fact from the beginning) Opera is the absolute best! But I’ll scrutinize any new development and, if something bad appears in the future, I’ll certainly reconsider!

    • Slawek Sochaj

      Thank you! We’ll do our best to bring you even better browsing experience.

    • http://nedhamson.wordpress.com/ Ned Hamson

      So how has Nokia done since Microsoft took over? I don’t see every other kid carrying one anymore. I hope it works out but in general, within a year the moving force people in design and engineering will be gone within 6-18 months and the product will meet the needs of the new owners which has little to do with the vision that has operated Opera.

      • plague

        Exactly. There are plenty of examples of what happens after an acquisition that supposedly would not change the former company’s “identity”: Nokia, Palm, Novell, Caldera/SCO, Maxis, Westwood, DICE, id Software, Bungee (who now has finally bought themselves freedom again), Gas Powered Games, Project Offset…. and so on.

  • Vlad

    Please add the ability to create new tab next to current through the context menu (RMB on the tab). Like in Chrome. It is very convenient and I use it constantly!
    Or add a keyboard shortcut Ctrl+Alt+T (as an example) for these purposes.

    • Great Dude

      Do you mean “Ctrl + T” which opens a new tab ?
      It works for me on Opera .

      • Vlad

        Open new tab next to the current one!

        • Aneta Reluga

          …as opposed to attaching it at the end of tabs row, yes. Your suggestion has been recorded, thanks :)

          • Vlad

            Thank! It would be great to see this feature in future versions.

          • xirit64

            Opera Presto used to have that in the settings, by default it was off.

        • Great Dude

          Ok now I got it. yeah good point I hope they add it.

          • Vlad

            I hope too 😉

    • xirit64

      Why use that when you can open a new tab 100 times faster by using a mouse gesture (hold right click + move mouse down)? That’s very inefficient and only anachronistic browsers like Chrome or Firefox work like that…

    • Vlad
  • PopovP

    Somehow I don’t trust the Chinese with my personal browsing. No offense intended. May be I will start using Vivaldi more.

    • Slawek Sochaj

      Stay tuned for privacy features we will add to Opera in upcoming months. This will make Opera very unique.

      • Wraith

        And Since you’re at it , it would be a good idea to add the feature to export our bookmarks, and let me know when the deal is offcially closed because I think I will need a feature like that.

    • Angela Wang

      Hi! I understand your concern. Our plan is to operate independently and from Norway as we have done. There’s no plan to change on our policy regarding users’ privacy and information safety. You can find the current security guidelines here: http://www.opera.com/security/policy I hope this clears some of your worries! /Angela

    • Geovanny Morillo

      It cannot be as bad as the US spying on us?

      • Olli

        It is as bad. That’s why we don’t use browsers from the US.

    • Angela Wang

      Hi! Nothing finalized yet. But if it goes through, Chinese ownership will not mean Chinese identity. We will remain a Norwegian company and handle user privacy like we do today – in accordance with European and Norwegian law. -Angela

  • 18558267859NortonantiViruscall

    @1-855-826-7859-Norton-antiVirus-customer-support-Toll-free-phone-number Call @18558267859

    • Krystian Kolondra

      Uhm…. Who is this?

      • Olli

        Spam, remove it already!

  • Mr.R

    #StillyourOpera :)

    • Angela Wang

      #Yes!

  • Mr.R

    I love Chineese Noodles.

    • Krystian Kolondra

      Programmers eat pizza :) No way we’re changing that.

      • Indiakumar

        Understandable. I have full trust in Opera Programmers. Pepperoni ?

  • Great Dude

    I hate when a good product or company is sold to a new company because there is a chance that good things, innovation, smart ideas, quality goes away .

    Yet it is not always a bad thing, I will wait and see and I really do hope the best for the Opera team and the good work to continue .

    Please consider this again and be sure that many companies don’t have the same values you have so don’t listen to non-written promises ,I am no lawyer but if you can let these promises becomes rules then do it if you will sell ; like they may acquire your company but they can’t change several things and rules .

    If for some reason you won’t be acquired then try to infiltrate China and east by ads on your first page and specific made extensions for big sites like Ali-Baba .

    • Angela Wang

      Thank you for your well wishes it’s very kind of you! It’s too early to make operational plan as the deal has yet to be officially recognized and closed. But when it comes to product development, the same teams and people will be innovating and refining Opera’s products, with the difference being that we will have opportunities to reach more users and partners, and have more resources to achieve the vision we have. As part of the social media team, I intend to keep our community engaged and open as before. So if you have any more concern just reach out to us:) /Angela

  • José Alberto

    Do you mean that chinesse buy opera or that opera team buy chinese teams? what are they the chinesse doing?

    • Tommy Wille

      Chinese buying Opera.

      • José Alberto

        o la laaa what a pity but I need turbo mode and yandex delete every link to stable version, so they force us to use beta versions, and the last beta does not work in win7 so I deleted yandex, so I onlly use opera, so I will lear to eat rice with “palitos” @Tommy Wille

  • Gurtej Singh

    If someone from Opera reads this. What happened to Private Tabs ? They had so much utility.

    • Krystian Kolondra

      Hi Gurtej, we read this :)

      what you mean by what happened to Private Tabs? Is something not working there for you?

      • Mikolaj Boc

        What Gurtej meant was private tabs in normal windows. We’re not currently working on such a feature, there’s a growing lobby here on blogs that demands those, may change over time.

        • Gurtej Singh

          Thanks for your replies awesome people :)

          I meant exactly that, private tabs in normal windows. I know you would be receiving tons of requests like these where people wish all Opera 12 features were cooked in.

          What made Opera stand out as were these features. When Blink was adopted, it was projected as an engine change. That’s what we as users wanted, an engine that just worked universally coupled with those awesome features.

  • Joana Silva
    • Angela Wang

      Hi Joanna. Just to clarify that Qihoo is only one of the interested parties of the consortium. No deal has been officially closed yet. /Angela

  • netwolf

    Chinese ownership, closed source software and privacy are 3 things that never ever go together well, sorry.
    You can talk about VPN, privacy policies and so on until hell freezes over, but that doesn’t change the obvious.
    Well, maybe a couple of users can use your new secret VPN product to circumvent the daily censorship in your new home country, but I can hardly think of users in the so called “free world” who deliberately use a chinese browser.
    Sorry, it’s been a great time since Opear 5.x, but that’s it for me now.

    • Angela Wang

      Hi @netwolf, nothing has been completely finalized yet. If the acquisition is to happen, Chinese ownership will not change Opera’s identity. We will be based out of Norway with the same teams and people working on our browsers and apps. User information will be handled in strict accordance with Norwegian law as it is today. /Angela

      • Vux777

        do you have legal verification of that (part of the contract terms)
        or saying just like that?

        how do you know what terms will new overs introduce?
        maybe you all get fired and production will move to China (in year or two)?
        $1.2B is a big pile of money
        I don’t think that someone after that kind of payment will indulge users wishes for eu browser, Norwegian identity etc….
        they have their own math (whatever it is)
        From all the Opera businesses, desktop browser is least money maker.
        It is a “hero” product, but … heroes get statues
        and world moves on

        • xirit64

          I’d like to know that as well ’cause PR talking is welcome but sometimes annoying when it’s repeated constantly without being based on facts, so @Angela Wang is that indeed part of the contract terms, or just the usual corporate PR damage control talking?

          • Krystian Kolondra

            We’re bad in damage control :) we’re just excited :)

            But seriously, I understand you might be concerned if something is going to happen to the product you care about. We are very positive things will just get better.

            But of course there’s no point in going “it’ll be great vs it’ll be bad”. No one can win until the time will pass and you could see the results. Let’s just wait and see since the deal is not finalized yet. You’ll hear from us for sure.

          • Angela Wang

            @xirit64:disqus and @vux777, it’s great that you are asking these questions. The purchase is not officially closed so no contract has been signed yet. Even if it is signed, I am not in the position of providing details. But as part of the Opera community, it’s my wish to keep our platform open and transparent. I feel responsible to let users know as much as we know, and the information and decision on staying true to our security policy is agreed on and shared internally to all staff. It’s something we stand for, and as it is the same teams of people who will enter the new org if the acquisition is through, Opera employees have all expressed our wish to stay true to who we are among ourselves.

            If you have any particular concern, here’s the full doc on how we handle security at Opera, and at the end you will find contact info for the legal department: http://www.opera.com/security/policy All of our operations are subject to Norwegian law.

            I hope this and as well as Krystian’s reply answer some of your doubts and concerns :)

          • xirit64

            Dear Angela, what you say just confirms us and don’t be offended by that please :). As long as the terms are unknown (and will be known only to the shareholders) everything else is just “wishful thinking”. Desire =/= Reality.
            That doesn’t mean though that I don’t wish that everything turns out well as you desire so that everyone (including us fans) can be happy!

          • netwolf

            You always tallk about the “same team of people”, but do you actually know that a _major_ part of this (original) team has been fired in the last 2 years, and almost no dev is left from the original team, since the last time the management made a decision. (many of those devs are now in the Vivaldi team btw)
            I don’t know how long you’ve been working for Opera, but as a formerly very active useres I do remember that a _lot_ has already changed since the ‘good old times’, and that not much has become better.
            Also, how can you say that ownership doesn’t change identity?? No offence, but I rarely read anything more naive than that….

        • Vux777

          OK, Arjan corrected me about desktop browser and revenues made trough it
          It turns out, desktop is doing very good
          according to Opera financial report
          http://www.operasoftware.com/content/download/7485/250452/version/2/file/4Q15.pdf

          …but my main point in comment was about (empty?!) promises
          Opera identity etc….
          no one can be sure what will became of it,
          wishes are another thing

      • plague

        “Chinese ownership will not change Opera’s identity. We will be based out of Norway with the same teams and people working on our browsers and apps”

        Famous last words.

        Nokia hiring “former” Microsoft high ranking employee Stephen Elop as new CEO:
        “We have a burning platform! Abandon ship!”. There is no future for Nokias own Linux based platform and Android will not let us be unique and it would be impossible to compete with other Android OEMs. Instead we should cooperate with Microsoft and use Windows Phone on all our devices. This cooperation will bring us more freedom to be unique and best serve our customers. It will be better for everyone. I am not a Microsoft plant and we will absolutely not sell out.

        What happened?
        Elop sunk Nokias phone business into the ground, de-valuing the company _alot_ in the process. From being one of the most powerful phone companies in the world to being irrelevant, in no time. Microsoft then, obviously, made an offer to purchase the phone/devices division of Nokia and license the brand name. Elop returned to Microsoft.
        Many people don’t even know Nokia still exists. They think Microsoft bought Nokia as a whole and killed it. Irreparable damage.
        Not a plant. Riiight.

        id Software acquisition by ZeniMax:
        We will not loose our identity and will be making our own decisions just like before. We will simply have more resources.

        What happened?
        ZeniMax started to interfere. Ofcourse they did. John Carmack started working on VR and collaborated with Oculus on that.
        He thought it would be the future and wanted to bring more of id’s games to VR, but ZeniMax did not agree and it all ended with John Carmack more or less being forced to leave the company he co-founded to go work with Oculus full time.
        That followed by ZeniMax suing Oculus for somehow stealing their IP, just because John Carmack worked a bit on VR while still at id.

        Westwood acquisition by EA:
        The Westwood company name is no more. EA renamed the company EA Pacific and later closed the studio down completely.
        Command & Conquer Generals was so buggy that it was impossible to play multiplayer without it crashing or de-syncing.
        EA _never_ fixed those bugs.
        A free-to-play, pay-to-win version of Command & Conquer was proposed as a winning concept, despite the C&C fans screaming “nooooo!” to the idea. It fell through very late in development, but not before the C&C brand name had been severely damaged.
        They completely stopped making Dune games, and the C&C & Red Alert games have been very few over the years.
        Three major RTS franchises from Westwood that EA managed to almost completely destroy (plus Generals of course).

        Maxis acquisition by EA:
        Maxis company name is no more. For years and years pretty much only The Sims games were pushed out, with hardly any Sim City games. When finally EA decided to make a new Sim City game, it had an always-online requirement, even for single player. And the servers went down constantly, making the game completely unplayable. EA claimed that the always-online requirement could not be removed from the game, that it would be impossible. Though somehow they managed to do just that some time later. Go figure.
        The game never recovered from that disaster.

        DICE acquisition by EA:
        Shareholders said loudly and clearly NO(!) to the acquisition proposal, knowing the history of EA acquisitions and what happens to the companies they acquire.

        What happened?
        EA managed to make the deal happen at a slightly later date, and then more or less told DICE that they are now a Battlefield-making company. All other projects were put on hold for years.
        Also, Battlefield 4 suffered from lots and lots of crippling bugs for months after release, obviously being forced to release before it was done. Classic EA move.

        And so on.
        There are dozens of examples.

        The pattern is that every company that is proposing to be acquired always say the same things.

        “This will not change our identity. It will still be the same company and the same people involved.”

        And it always ends the same way, the former company is gone.
        Their “identity” is reduced to just a brand, if even that.

        Having an office in Norway is expensive, compared to having one in China, so I wouldn’t be the least bit surprised if they decided to close you down in a year or two and move everything to China.

        They might not even be interested in the browser at all, but more interested in the ad-business or just the brand itself, slapping a big red O on just about any software or online service and calling it “Opera”.

        Whatever it may be, I would be _highly_ surprised if Opera, as it is today (both the company and the browser), will exist two/three years from now.

        • Krystian Kolondra

          @disqus_hhEhFiXkBI:disqus, that’s an impressive list and myself being into gaming too I totally agree – these are the examples it didn’t work.

          Truth is – we’re not a company in trouble, we’re also not a gaming company that badly needs next title to hit the charts. I am not saying it will be perfect in our case – predicting the future is actually very hard.

          I’ll just say – we’re looking to accelerate our growth. And if we want to win the hearts of even more users – we have to make sure we offer them products they want and they trust.

          If we fail with that – it will not matter if we’re backed up with Chinese, US or European money.

          • plague

            The gaming companies are just a few examples of failed acquisitions.
            There are plenty more and I did mention Nokia aswell. But others are: Palm, Novell and Caldera/SCO, for example.
            Those are tech companies that are more closely related to your line of business. And they failed miserably after being acquired.

            Edit: Oh, not to mention Sun, who lost all identity after being acquired by Oracle. From being a well-liked and friendly tech company, to Oracle killing most of it’s products and suing just about everyone for using open source Sun technology. /Edit

            Truth is, if you are _not_ a company in trouble, you should not go looking for trouble by getting yourselves acquired.
            If you let yourselves be bought by someone else, then it will be _their_ vision that controls you, not _your_ vision. Effectively ending your control of the company.

          • Krystian Kolondra

            I am sure you can find also the companies that were acquired and ended up successful.

            As for the vision – vision for the product is the vision of people that are making it. And what we are trying to say – we are staying here for you and our plan is to make our products even better.

            There’s no way we can prove anything until you see it. But similarly there’s no way to prove us wrong :)

          • plague

            Of course, but history tells us to be very fearful of what to come.
            It is way more common in the tech industry that the acquired company drops off the radar completely and it’s tech gets incorporated into the parent company’s own tech.

            It’s not for nothing that you now have a lot of very worried users.
            We’ve all heard it before: “don’t worry, nothing will change”, only to have that not be true at all, and our belowed software either dropped or otherwise destroyed beyond recognition.

            We _will_ worry, and I would not be the least bit surprised if this turns out very badly for us, the users.

  • Dark Magician

    Your browser content blocking is breaking this very page.

    It’s time you open the source code.

    • plague

      Ain’t gonna happen unfortunately. :(

      People suggested that when they said it was too much work doing daily patching on Presto for IE/Chrome specific hacks/issues that websites incorporated.
      They then said that open sourcing was not an option, because then they would not be able to compete if anyone could use their engine.
      Then they did a 180 and dropped Presto completely for an open source engine, webkit/blink, and all of a sudden it was possible to compete with open source tech.

      Even after dropping Presto, they refused to open source it, instead letting it fade away and die.

      It’s a damn shame, as Presto was a way leaner engine than webkit, while still being more standards compliant, and having that open sourced could have been awesome.
      Remember that webkit/blink started life as KHTML from the KDE project, and somehow went on to become the most used engine on the planet.

      Having Opera hack on blink and hopefully making it leaner is absolutely a good thing, but having Presto as a serious open source contender would have been way better.

      • Christian Büte

        Maybe this is stupid, but what if they USED Presto to make Blink faster? Let’s admit, Opera is significantly faster than Chrome, so it would make sense if that is why it isn’t open sourced, because the team found out how to merge both of them and this is their “secret ingredient”. It’s just my personal conspiracy, but I can imagine. :)

      • jedy123

        This topic has been discussed to death over at the Opera forums. Try reading this thread then maybe you’ll understand a bit more why Opera had to abandon Presto. Presto was never ‘way leaner’ for a start. Quite the opposite.

        http://forums.opera.com/discussion/1867365/why-did-opera-go-from-presto-to-chromium/p1

  • yigido

    Qihoo and Chinese companies have bad reputation for privacy! This is what I care about most.. You said “we will never change, it is your Opera bla bla…” I heard these promises before when you jump to Opera 15+ from our loved Opera12.x.. at the same day.. today 12.02.2013 “3 years ago” you closed Opera 12 era and since that day you cannot give us the feature that we even still have in that great browser.

    Time to say good bye guys. I saw a new browser for my needs and they implement new usefull things faster! Say good bye..farewell!!

    • Krystian Kolondra

      Good bye yigido.

      I understand you decided to go elsewhere – we do respect your choice even though I’m sorry to hear it since I see you were passionate about Opera in the past.

      The fact that some feature was in Opera 12 does not make it automatically worth it to be reimplemented in new Opera. Browsers do evolve too.

      We listen to our users – many times my colleagues have responded here or directly to the constructive feedback wrt what is missing or how certain features could be improved. We value such feedback a lot.

      Also – we spend a lot of time with our users in many countries trying to understand what they expect from the product and since now we have a solid foundation we plan to accelerate our work. We do care.

      However we understand that you can expect something different – and that we will not please everyone equally. That’s the truth for any product and we will not pretend otherwise.

      Please anyway keep an eye on us as we will stay here and we will continue with Opera browser, which we are very proud of.

      Best of luck.

      • yigido

        Thank you for your efforts! I hope good things to my old browser. But those Chinese always destroy what they have hands on.
        I undestand you too. Opera is free desktop browser and you can sell it witha good money. Business is business.

        Good luck you too.

    • jho

      I hope you are also not using any service / software which is based in the US. Are you using FB / WhatsApp? They have privacy issues too. I am from germany and we all knew somehow that we were spied by the US but how large the spying was was shocking.

      • yigido

        Check here: https://prism-break.org/en/
        I have no FB or Whatsapp. Just Disqus. 😛
        Full privacy doesn’t exist! I am trying to keep myself as private as possible.

  • http://ratwhiskers.tumblr.com ratwhiskers

    If you think ownership by a Chinese consortium won’t change Opera’s identity, then either you’re a fool, or you think we’re fools. You think they’ll have no agenda? No demands? No rules? You’ll conform to their identity or you’ll be purged, and you’re a fool to believe otherwise. For the outlandish $1.2B price tag being rumored, I’d dare say you’ll be well and plenty obligated to do so too.

    But by all means, keep consoling us with your hash tag campaign. Would you like to know how to write “#StillYourOpera” in chinese? Guess what? It won’t matter, because Twitter is censored in China.

    • Krystian Kolondra

      Actually last time I checked – Twitter worked there with Turbo turned on in Opera.

      And please guys don’t be rude – we’re just making browsers 😉 It’s ok to say what you think but don’t accuse us of anything.

      • http://ratwhiskers.tumblr.com ratwhiskers

        No, you’re not just making browsers. This blog post is not about making browsers. It’s about damage control and spin-doctoring a change of ownership that you’re well aware will not sit well with a user base concerned about things like privacy, security, and open web standards. If you were “just making browsers”, this blog post wouldn’t exist.

        My rudeness is a result of the pretentious assumption that a catchy hash tag and some empty promises will be enough to assuage people’s concerns without having to acknowledging or address those concerns.

        • Krystian Kolondra

          This post was a response to the questions we started to receive the moment the news about potential acquisition was out. Call it a damage control if you like – I would rather say it’s an attempt to share our view of the situation. We were open with our users in the past and we plan to continue.

          Sorry for the catchy hash tag though ;-), we thought it was nice since it does reflect what we think.

          What can we do more than to promise? Did we change ourselves? Did we stop respecting users privacy or security as some started predict we would? Are we the bad guys because someone wants to invest in us?

          And no – please don’t be rude. We respond better to the good discussion, we respect you guys and we expect the same from you.

          • http://ratwhiskers.tumblr.com ratwhiskers

            You’re not the bad guys because someone wants to invest in you. You’re the bad guys for claiming that a change in ownership will have no affect on the integrity and identity of the company. For promising the source of your investment income will have no influence on the integrity of your product when you know you cannot make that promise. For jumping at the chance to service an economic market ruled by a political force that contradicts the founding principals of what made Opera great in the first place. You’re the bad guys for claiming you’re still “our Opera”, when you haven’t been “our Opera” since 2013.

            I’ve had enough and I’m done. After 18 years I’m through with Opera Software. I don’t care what you do anymore. Go chase your Chinese elephant and good luck.

      • trlkly

        And this comment cemented it for me. You can’t actually argue against the claims, so you’re claiming rudeness in the people making them. It might be different if you actually addressed anything he said, but instead just give a snarky response.

        Yes, you can currently use the proxy owned by Opera to use Twitter in China. So what? What reason do we have to think that will continue when China can tell the new owners they have to adhere to the Great Firewall or have the government come down on them?

        Ownership by a Chinese company, especially one that has a track record of privacy violations, is a serious proposition. And you completely glossed over any of the downsides in your announcement. This does not make you look good.

        If you don’t like accusations of wrongdoing, then counter them. You don’t get to just say they’re rude and ignore them.

        • Krystian Kolondra

          I don’t like the accusations of wrongdoing since we’re not doing anything wrong.

          I don’t like the rudeness since people deserve respect, not be called fools.

          I recommend watching the movie ‘Minority Report’ before accusing us on the belief of what can happen.

          Having said that – we are just excited on the potential possibilities such an investment can bring us – and that’s what I shared. We have hope to repeat Volvo’s success (http://tinyurl.com/hc8c8yr) – that’s it, not trying to fool anyone.

          • Krystian Kolondra

            I’ll just add – I like good discussions and we like to be challenged by you, others and actually some of the feedback you’ve given here and in other comments about the privacy and security makes us think: everyone claims to be secure, private etc. but then suddenly some have your data, private modes are not private etc. So what choices do browsers vendor have to reassure users they’re the good guys? What you guys think?

          • trlkly

            So? That person thinks you are doing something wrong. When you cite someone’s rudeness rather than argue against them, you’re admitting you don’t have a counter argument.

            Bringing up a bit of fiction as if it has anything to do with real life is not remotely going to be convincing. Not that I have any idea what you are trying to get at in the first place. I can see nothing about the movie that has any relevance to this situation. It involves a police state that exploits gifted children in order to detect crim before it happens–and instead of trying to stop it, they arrest them. And, ultimately, they find out the future is not set in stone, anyways.

            So what? The point is that you are doing something extremely dangerous because you want to make money. The desire to make money beyond what you need is something you as a Norwegian should have a huge problem with. You’re being greedy, and taking risks with other people’s data, and crapping on them for having problems with it.

          • Krystian Kolondra

            @trlkly:disqus, thinking differently than us is OK. It’s OK to be concerned. Being emotional OK too. But calling others fools or accusing us of trying to fool someone is not OK. I respect others and expect the same.

            I don’t have a feeling of dodging a question or anything. I just don’t see how I could argue with the claims we should not trust someone or someone is having an agenda. The reason I referred to the movie was – as you pointed out – the future is not written in the stone. I guess many people suddenly became experts about the future, of course the bad future ;-). I am not pretending to be the one – but I’m hoping for a good future, like in Volvo case.

            It’s simply hard to accept being punished when nothing bad has happened. That’s exactly my point here – we care about our product and the users. Nothing has changed.

            As for being greedy – we as the employees are not benefiting from being acquired. What is exciting to us however is that if we go private we could be allowed to invest a lot more into our products. And building products used by millions is fun. Believe me.

            Best!

    • deroxil

      Зато в США “свобода слова и никакой цензуры нет вообще”. Смешная шутка.

  • Kurt Zon

    Ummm how’s 37 coming along?

    • BK

      Yes, ofc, next week.

      • Kurt Zon

        Great!!

  • Indiakumar

    I have full trust in Opera people. They never compromise on anything. So I will continue my love towards Opera. Give me more features friends.. Love from India.

    • Slawek Sochaj

      Thank you for your trust and stay tuned for more features.

  • Arky Lyngdoh

    I love Opera browser and I’m concerned because Qihoo is a company thats been caught doing some shady stuff

    • Angela Wang

      Hi Arky, the Consortium is made up by a number of parties, among which Kunlun will be the biggest shareholder if the deal is to go through. The current leadership and teams at Opera will remain. /Angela

  • nick_el_son

    Think I’ll move to Edge or Mozilla.
    Do not want my passwords and other personal info to be shared with Chinese intelligence services.

    • xirit64

      But US and UK intelligence services (big brother) are better? :)

      • nick_el_son

        EU/US companies have higher rate of independence from governmental cervices, than Chinese ones have.

        • xirit64

          I really would want to believe that. The reality is that no one has independence when it comes to secret services and their global role of monitoring people to control them. Check PRISM. Maybe the time has come for people to do something about it, at least in Europe. http://diem25.org/

          • nick_el_son

            Oh c’mon.. stop spreading this leftwing bullshit..

            No one believes that we can avoid some kind of control by government, but do you really think that situation in western world and in china/russia/etc. are in the same level?

            I rather trust my private data to microsoft than any kind of “independent” chinese company.

          • xirit64

            If that is bullshit to you then you’d better stop complaining about privacy and intelligence services in the first place…

          • jho

            nickelson is surely from the US. I am from germany and we here know that the US is spying us somehow, but the amount of spying made us speechless.. I mean how can you say China is bad in terms of privacy and US is good and they will do no bad things with our data. Looool.

            Don’t get me wrong. I like the USA and I also like the Chinese people. Bur argumenting that every Chinese company is evil and every western company is good is just stupid.

          • nick_el_son

            I’m no from US and I do realize that every government of every country has an intelligence service which spies to every suspicious human or non-human activities including spying on people from their own countries.

            Also I can see the difference between US/EU and for example China: first of them have laws to regulate the governmental influence and more or less protect privacy of ordinary people, meanwhile the second one has no respect of privacy and everything is controlled by the government services (Remember who had banned internet social media, including FB and google?).

            So, don’t tell me that handing of Opera to Chinese companies is a good idea

    • hari.g

      If you had synchronisation in mind, that feature by default encrypts synced passwords with your credentials. It also provides an option to use a different password to protect your data. You can configure this in the settings.

      • Pytak

        Or you can, you know, switch it off. My head is pretty good for password storage, personally.

        • nick_el_son

          I’ve just erased all info and deleted my opera account.
          As soon as they become Chinese company, I’ll switch myself to other browser.

    • Slawek Sochaj

      That would be sad. Please, take note, that all data will continue to be handled in accordance with Norwegian and European law. Nothing has changed in this respect.

      • Piotr Żółtowski (Piter432)

        Yeah, sure. The plans about Opera after changing engine in your browser also wasn’t change…

        • Rômulo

          Exactly. And we all know what happened.

    • catup

      Who do you want to share with your passwords. I think no one. But you are sharing all your stuff with the internet providers. Everything runs well if no evil.

      • nick_el_son

        With no one, that’s the point. And I do not believe that all the data which is currently protected by Norwegian and EU laws, will be kept unaffected when all rights and access to Opera databases will be transferred into the hands of Qihoo or other Chinese companies.

        As for the internet providers, I have the same approach.

        I just do not trust my privacy to such kind of totalitarian regimes.

        • catup

          As I know, lots of people are using Qihoo’s products now and no personal information leakage has been reported previously. Every time when people talk about Qihoo, a smart but a little bit bay boy comes into my mind. Qihoo has some rumour of doing evil, but it is indeed stopping some other software from doing evils. Qihoo is a small company compared with Baidu, and Tencent in China. It has been struggling to survive in the battle with these big guys in China. Now, it has a huge user population.

  • Bjarne Bertelsen

    Opera becoming chinese is very very sad indeed. Nothing good will come out of it.

    • Slawek Sochaj

      Opera plans to continue operating as a stand-alone company, and will remain a Norwegian company.

      • catup

        Well, Will Opera just financially belongs to Qihoo?

        • Angela Wang

          Hi. The parties that expressed the interest to acquire Opera consist of several internal companies, with Kunlun being the largest one follow by Qihoo /Angela

      • Piotr Żółtowski (Piter432)

        ChrOpera will remain Norwegian? XDDDDD So why Norwegian ChrOpera fired all people from desktop dev team in main ChrOpera’s HQ (Norway) and changed “power” in ChrOpera from desktop team in Norway to desktop team in Poland?

        • Leonardo Gomes

          Maybe because that’s how business works?

          Opera had been developed in several offices (Norway, Sweden, Poland, France, etc) since a long time but the ones in charge seemed to have decided that it would be better for the company if the development of a certain product was concentrated in a specific office.

          It was just a business/administrative decision like many others done in every single company on every single work day.

          • Krystian Kolondra

            Exactly. Desktop browser is developed today in Poland, Norway and France.

          • xirit64

            That’s news to me I thought the entire development office in Norway was shut down and only the base of operations, marketing etc remained in Norway.

          • Leonardo Gomes

            Even before that latest change, Opera already had been developed in places other than Norway, mainly in Sweden iirc.
            It was back in the 2000’s, maybe even before that.

          • xirit64

            I know that already, what I’m talking about is a different thing.

    • catup

      disagree

  • catup

    I do not care who is going to own the company but do care the browser performance. There is no real privacy but only relative privacy. I will decide to continue using opera or not only based on my experience about opera.

    • Angela Wang

      I hope our work will match up your expectation :) If there is any bug you can reach out to us @Opera on twitter or use this bug reporting form – https://bugs.opera.com/wizarddesktop/ /Angela

  • dedektif
  • tarkus

    The whole internet is a field for spying, stealing & exchanging information for state & private purposes! No-one is safe. CIA, FBI, EU authorities, among others, have developed software to monitor specific references to names or expressions and locate their sources. Intelligent services have been spying on state leaders (including the German chancellor). All kind of trojans & malicious software are attacking, and eventually penetrating, our computers. Chinese are only a part of this scheme. Lets don’t fool ourselves that anybody is ‘safe’. Of course, there is one – and only one -difference between Chinese and the others: no Chinese inside source is going to reveal anything, like some westerners do (and because of that get arrested and face accusations of revealing ‘state secrets’). Other than that, there is no difference between companies of any nation that spying on our browsing habits! If you think Google is better, you’ve got another thing coming!
    @ catup said it right, and I agree ‘I do not care who is going to own the company but do care the browser performance’. That’s not to say that I’m not keeping an eye on things, to the best of my abilities of course!

    • Joana Silva

      All chinese browser/antivirus/cleaner/tweaker FREE I used and then uninstalled it, after a scan with app malwarebytes and so on, I found out unwanted files (registry keys, adwares, spywares, background services, PUPs-potentially unwanted program, etc.) Ok, I’ll give a try to Opera, but each update I’ll scan my PC with malwarebytes and others similars apps and if I find out any unwanted file I’ll uninstall Opera immediately and spread to all my friends, foruns, etc. Also, I’m a owner of a Brazilian Opera Comunity on G+, so I’m going to keep the members abreast of updates and newness… My PC is now completely clean, I’m a hard user and computer technician since long years ago, so I know what I’m saying. I will wait for future updates of Opera, do a scanning and if I notice some estrando behavior from Opera, I’ll take a screenshot of scanning and post right here and in my community on G+. Moreover, good lucky new Opera team!

  • catup

    Qihoo has its own browser. Will you guys merge it together with opera browser?

  • Vlad
  • Vlad
  • trlkly

    Look. The only reason a company would make an acquisition like this is that they think there’s a way to make more money than they are handing out. Opera as is clearly doesn’t make that type of money currently, or else an acquisition would not result in more funding. Something has to change.

    Now, maybe these changes will be in China only. Maybe it’s just that Opera will be used to replace these companies own web browsers. Maybe they’re just use the new code assets they will acquire to make other things. Or, if they do take it overseas, maybe they won’t touch the Opera browser itself, and only offer extra stuff/

    But what gives everyone pause is that these are Chinese companies, who have a rather authoritarian government controlling them, and are a disaster when it comes to business ethics. China is pretty much the counterfeit capital of the world. One of the companies you named specifically has problems.

    So I’m just going to give the one thing you could do to reassure me. Open up your source somewhat. I don’t mean you have to let everyone use it. But you can at least be transparent with the code you add. Even if you keep some of it private, open up anything to do with privacy and create an (also open source) encrypted sandbox that would make it impossible for the closed source portion of the browser to affect this. If someone notices an exploit that gets into the sandbox, publicly fix those exploits.

    A closed source browser owned by a Chinese company just isn’t trustworthy. That you’re doing it to make more money rather than because you are struggling as a company doesn’t help us trust you, either.

    Oh, and start adding features people have been begging you for, as a show of good faith. I still can’t believe you haven’t reimplemented multirow tabs or hiding the titlebar in Linux (which Chrome even does automatically).

    • Krystian Kolondra

      @trlkly:disqus when it comes to source code sharing to some extent we do that already, you can check http://sourcecode.opera.com and any handy dev can compile and step-by-step debug even the closed code parts of the browser (which are mostly UI).

      You can be 100% open source and still be bad for users – in fact you don’t even need to have any products – just buy exploits on the black market and that’s it.

      We are and we will operate under the Norwegian law. We are respecting users security and privacy today and will continue tomorrow as we did in the past. This has nothing to do with the capital backing us but rather has to do with the work ethics. We’re not just ‘a company’ – we are people who like and enjoy our work on browsers.

      And yes – you do acquire companies to make even more money. Opera is a profitable company today – we just need a bigger market share. And to get there you need better products not worse, right?

      • ayespy

        Actually, no. You do not need better products. You need products of “broader appeal,” which pursuit is what has brought us the dumbing down of “modern” browsers.

        The “free” market is rife with examples of products that have broader appeal but which are of inferior quality to their predecessors. In the corporate domain, products need only be more profitable, not better.

      • xirit64

        “- we just need a bigger market share”

        I’m with you but the big difference here is that YOU are being acquired and not the opposite, so this translates to “THEY need a bigger market share”. (forgive my caps but it’s the only way to say it in english :), a phonetic language). Also if you would like to have stayed independent (in the sense that then your & Angela’s talk about staying true to “YOUR vision” and “YOUR way” would actually make sense and be based on something real other than the elusive “wishful belief” of the… allow me to say “boring” PR talk) and penetrate/expand to those markets -to get a bigger market share as you say, you could do it with the usual ways, instead you have chosen to be bought 100% by someone else… that’s very illogical and contradicting. For sure you see it as an opportunity, I just hope you won’t regret it very fast, because usually promises and friendly attitude in the harsh corporate world only last until the final signature has been signed in the acquisition contract.

      • trlkly

        If you are profitable company today, then you don’t need a bigger market share. You want a bigger market share. You are putting getting money over the good of your users. It’s the same problem Mozilla and Google have, now.

        But at least we can see their source code. We know they can’t sneak stuff in. You don’t seem to understand that the way you are acting makes you less trustworthy.

        And you cannot say you will continue to be placed in Norway and work under Norwegian law if you are owned by another company. By definition, that company can tell you what to do. The law matters not, since they can just shut you down and move the company to China.
        Having them invest in you, but not have a controlling share? Fine. Being bought out? That means you will inevitably wind up working under their rules, not your own. You can try to argue against this all you want. It’s just what happens.

        Your only hope is that your current rules are more profitable, so they allow you to keep them.

        • Krystian Kolondra

          Yes. We WANT more users to use our products. We want more market share. There’s a lot of work ahead of us. People usually work for money – but money is rarely a good motivator – and certainly not for many at Opera. We are excited about other things.

          You cannot compile Chrome yourself – only Chromium. You can actually see our code and compile it, debug etc. – refer to my comment above.

          You’re right – if we fail to make great products – owners can shut down everything – also today’s owners. But it’s *IF*. What *IF* we’re successful?

          Being profitable is problematic, especially if you have to be profitable every quarter ;-( – like today. We would love to invest a lot for a year or two – to build a better product, to let more people know about it etc. Then we could be 10x more profitable as the result.

  • Christian Büte

    On a scale of 1 to 10, how much can you promise that nothing will change with the acquisition (IF it happens)?

    • Olli

      Legally speaking: Zero.

  • kamiszczu

    Will be good if this menu will be improved, because it does not look good
    http://s7.postimg.org/5gs7oftbb/image.png

  • Tiago

    Well, i just hope that 2016 will be a great year to Opera’s team and users.

    To be honest i’m only using Opera atm by pure love since i literally use Opera since i was a kid, and the other reason is because i don’t have any other better choise since some other browsers out there thinks they’re pac-man eating all ram from my machine.

  • _artem_

    RIP opera. was using it since I had to use keygen to activate it 😀

    • Slawek Sochaj

      You will still have many reasons to use Opera. If the acquisition is to happen, Chinese ownership will not change Opera’s identity. We will be based out of Norway with the same teams and people working on our browsers and apps.

      • LoverOfLife

        Yes, but probably (maybe certainly) this team will implement “stuff” accordingly to the new Chinese owners. Let’s wait, in see the results

  • Baobob

    Dear board of directors,
    Please don’t do that.
    Sincerely,
    Baobob

  • http://trustnoduck.blogspot.tw/ 茶米

    Being bought out by Chinese companies is one thing; being bought out by Qihoo 360 is another. Good luck to Opera and the users that are still around after this.

    • Slawek Sochaj

      Please, take note, that if the acquisition happens, Qihoo 360 will be the minority investor, while Kunlun will be the controlling one.

  • jedy123

    The key word in this article is ‘consider’ as in ‘a recommendation to our shareholders to consider an acquisition’ No deal has been done yet. It is possible no deal will be done at all. People need to calm down a bit, keep using Opera and wait and see what happens.

  • tarkus

    Opera is not a family business. They have to make money to survive and don’t cut jobs. It seems they are constantly looking to acquire and get acquired. This is the business today: survive or be at the bottom of the food chain! Any deal is not necessarily bad – both parties will win something and lose something, let’s hope that finally they’ll cut a good deal, and the Company profile – and, most of all, the personnel and devs – will not take a blow but continue to move forward!

  • Xavier Roemer

    Maybe we can get Presto back since there are resources now to back an own enigine?

    Probably won’t happen.

  • icetom

    “User information will be handled in strict accordance with Norwegian law as it is today. /Angela”

    and that of course will not stop our data “leaking” to chinese agencies.
    And your great vpn tech is intransparent. I dont see why I would need this vpn technology, especially as you give no proof of why it is really protecting our data.
    Bigger userbases today are all about personal data, its a oxymoron that you say you protect our data after beeing bought by those companies.

    Opera lied to me before when you told me the addition of advertisement speeddial entries are a bug, but they have been implemented in various versions after you answered me “its a bug” here.

  • Wraith

    Shh… I thought this would be a good year for Opera ,I beginning to feel comfortable with the changes in the browser, but now I do not know what to think.

  • adil
  • led9ru

    Opera_1218_int_Setup.exe 15-Feb-2016 11:24
    Opera_1218_int_Setup_x64.exe 15-Feb-2016 11:32
    http://get.geo.opera.com/ftp/pub/opera/win/1218/int/

    What exactly they added there?
    write your version.

  • Alec Stone

    Selling to Qihoo 360 is like selling to Sauron, the dark lord, himself. I already uninstalled Opera… This is a sad day.
    I really loved your browser, but selling to the Chinese government. -.-

    • Marko Koivuniemi

      Hmm. That reminds me about some old (Finnish) joke about man who goes to the restaurant. Waitress recommends beef tongue and customer says: “No way I’m going to eat something that has been in someone’s mouth. Bring me some eggs instead.” I am saying that I don’t trust for example US government either.

      • Alec Stone

        I don’t trust them, either. I don’t think Google is better by any terms… This was the main reason I used Opera in the first place. Now I have to install Firefox and keep trying not to vomit over my keyboard because of the bad looking UI… And keep hoping that Vivaldi will be the answer a lot of people are looking for now.

        • Wraith

          Firefox is good but the UI is horrible, if you are use to Opera the only available option is Vivaldi, well after seeing this announcement about Opera being sold to the chinese I began to test Vivaldi and is really really Fast, the UI need work but is still in beta so a lot can improve.

          • jedy123

            Despite the nods back to Opera Presto, there are a number of things I don’t like about Vivaldi. I don’t think its a good idea to rely on a newish, unproven pre-release as a main browser. Also the UI as it is now is horrible.

          • Wraith

            Yes I know, right now I’m just testing Vivaldi but no using it as my main browser, the UI still need work, the speed dial tiles are huge and a long list, but I feel is the only browser that can be compared with Opera.

        • Regis

          The UI of Firefox can be customized . It’s easy to modify it to be almost the same as Chrome or Opera .

        • jedy123

          The permissions for Firefox add ons is worse than for Chrome (and Opera) plugins. This is one reason I favour Opera. Take this excerpt from an article about Chrome plugin permissions:

          ‘While Chrome’s permission warning messages can seem a bit scary to some users, it’s important to consider that the situation is worse with other web browsers.

          For example, when you install a Firefox add-on, the add-on has full permission to access your entire computer, if it wants. There’s no permission system in Firefox. The only limitation is Windows’ User Account Control, which prevents the add-on from running with administrator privileges.

          If you pay attention while installing a Firefox add-on, you’ll see a similar warning message, although it’s less specific than Chrome’s warning message’.

          http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/chrome-plugins-access-all-data-browsing-activity/

          • Joana Silva

            Ha, ha, ha.
            So, those of you who think denying an app permissions is protecting your privacy? All your information is already known by large secretive U.S corporations, they control the world and all of us like little puppets, using their media to herd us left or right. Don’t worry about plugins, Google already knows how fast you can walk, your gate and how many hairs
            you have on your left bumb cheek. I wouldn’t worry about plugins when military satellites can peer through your roof from space and in high definition. 😉

  • xirit64

    So could more funding mean also the return of the “Bookmark sharing” feature that was cut some time ago? There’s no reason to not have that now with so much more money backup, no? 😛

    • Leonardo Gomes

      Afaik the service was closed due to a low usage, so i guess it would only come back if (much) more people started to use it apart from the additional funding.

      • xirit64

        they never know about that feature’s usage until they present it to a wider audience with a different mentality (you know, asian culture 😛 ), right?

  • deroxil

    А чего так у всех бомбит/пригорает/печёт/рвёт/льётся из-за того, что Opera будет под контролем китайского консорциума? Всё норм. Не бомбите -__-

  • dedektif