One of Opera’s most popular features is Off-Road mode. It’s designed to keep your mobile device online anywhere, anytime – even under extreme conditions.

Just how extreme?

We put our mobile browsers in the hands of two of the world’s top BASE jumpers, Tom Erik Heimen and Kjersti Eide, on their latest excursion to the 1000-meter high granite cliffs of Kjerag, in southwestern Norway. We spoke to Tom Erik and Kjersti about their experience using Opera in Kjerag, as well as their passion for BASE jumping.

Tom Erik Heimen, aptly nicknamed BASEheimen, calls his wing suit his “fighter plane.” The 37-year-old from Molde, Norway has over 1000 jumps under his belt, and has been featured as one of “The Birdmen” on CBS News to round up a list of the world’s most daring flyers. He puts high value on quality gear.

“Second best is not good enough for me. Quality helps me perform better in whatever I am doing.”

Kjersti Eide is a nurse by profession; but when not at work, she skydives and BASE jumps. She stands out among other BASE jumpers with her personalized wing suits, which are white with red butterflies. Kjersti confesses to being constantly restless, always challenging herself both physically and mentally.

“On the exit, I always get a little bit stressed. But when I get my wings on, I get more focused about my flight and think to myself, This is something I know how to do, I can fly.”

The Kjerag mountain range is in Lysefjorden. This is where the world-famous Kjeragbolten is located, visited by many hikers especially during the summer.

Tom and Kjersti recount their Kjerag experience below:

Why do you BASE jump?

TEH: I really like to fly! Plus I always learn something new in this sport. BASE jumping takes me to spectacular places around the world. Also, I BASE jump to spend time out in nature. To jump in my “fighter plane” is an awesome experience.

KE: BASE jumping is more about getting away from the drop zone and still being able to fly. I have also built a good network of friends from the BASE community.

What do you do before a jump?

TEH: I always look at the trees, water, and other elements around me as wind indicators. Off-Road in Opera is also a great tool when I have bad reception, for times when I have to check weather forecasts online.

KE: I have this punamu kiwi-greenstone I got from a friend from New Zealand. It belongs around my neck – always. I forgot it once on a BASE trip that was going last for two weeks, and I had to get someone to send it to me.

What plays in your head at that exact moment you jump?

TEH: I check my gear. In the moment, I focus on my line and technique. In flight, I just enjoy the moment.

KE: On the exit point my head is kind of “empty,” ready to really feel and be in the moment. During and after a jump, I feel and remember every split second. I have never tried meditation, but maybe this is a little bit like that, the ability to empty your thoughts and stay focused.

How would you describe jumping off Kjerag?

TEH: It is a sweet spot for jumpers. I like the feeling of standing on the cliff and looking straight into the fjord. Landing beside the fjord is wonderful; everybody should experience this one time in their lives.

KE: Kjerag is a beautiful place. It’s the area where I practice my aerials, and where I first tried my wing suit. There are a lot of different exit points, and a lot of opportunities to conquer different levels of challenges in BASE jumping.

Here, we let you experience Kjerag through a raw cut of the jump using a camera attached to Tom Erik’s helmet.

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